The goal: To increase the percentage of Floridians age 25 to 64 with a high-quality post-secondary degree or credential to 60% by 2025.

Florida’s civic health, prosperity, and success in creating good jobs for its citizens depends on its ability to increase college success for all students, including low-income and first generation college-goers, adult learners, and students of color. This profile indicates key demographic, equity and attainment challenges confronting the state.


A COLLEGE-EDUCATED POPULATION IN FLORIDA – TODAY AND TOMORROW

Today, Florida ranks slightly below the nation in the percentage of adults ages 25-64 who have a college degree. Assuming that current trends in college completion and in-migration of college-educated adults continue, Florida is expected to fall substantially behind the nation on this measure in 2025. This will also leave the state short of the college-educated population needed to meet workforce demands and compete with best-performing nations.


A CHANGING DEMOGRAPHIC PICTURE

To expand its college-educated population, Florida must pay attention to projected demographic changes, especially growth among Hispanics and African Americans, who together represent a substantial share of the current population.


EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT BY RACE AND ETHNICITY

Florida must address racial and ethnic disparities in the percentage of college-educated adults, particularly with respect to Hispanics and African Americans.


STUDENT PROGRESS TO AND THROUGH COLLEGE

Florida currently stands as one of the lowest-performing states in the nation in the percentage of students completing high school, and is also behind the nation in the percentage of recent high school graduates going on to college.

Further along the educational pipeline, Florida must increase the proportion of students completing both two- and four-year college programs to be competitive with bestperforming states – and nations – by 2025.